9 Surprising Facts About Smacks Cereal

While Smacks has been around since 1953, the cereal has seen many changes over the years including new mascots and recipes. Did you know Dig’em Frog wasn’t always the Smacks mascot? In fact there were at least seven other Smacks mascots.

Here are nine surprising facts about Kellogg’s Smacks cereal.

1. Smacks Cereal Was Released Back in 1953

Smacks cereal first hit shelves way back in 1953. Although they were called Sugar Smacks at the time, the mascot of this Kellogg’s breakfast cereal was Cliffy the Clown until 1956.

Sugar Smacks cereal box with Cliffy the Clown
Image: Tod Frye

2. Sugar Smacks ➡ Smacks ➡ Honey Smacks

Smacks cereal were originally called Sugar Smacks when they first came out in 1953. This name lasted until the 1980s when Kellogg’s changed the name to Honey Smacks.

Then in the early 1990s, Kellogg’s dropped the word Honey and renamed it to Smacks. Finally in 2004, Honey was added back to the name.

Today, Smacks cereal is called Honey Smacks in the United States. The name Smacks is used in other countries such as Germany, Spain, and France.

3. Smacks Has More Sugar Than a Glazed Donut

One serving of Honey Smacks has 14 grams of sugar according to Kellogg’s while a glazed Dunkin’ Donut has 12 grams sugar.

Honey Smacks nutrition facts

4. Smacks Cereal Is 1/3 Sugar

As you can see by the Honey Smacks nutrition facts above, one serving of Honey Smacks is 42 grams. Out of this 42 grams, 14 grams is sugar. That means that 1/3 of Honey Smacks is pure sugar by weight.

While Smacks contains whole grain wheat and palm oil, the only other ingredients are sugar, glucose syrup, and honey—all sugary substances.

5. Smacks Is Not Gluten Free

Smacks contains whole grain wheat. Therefore Smacks is not a gluten free product.

6. Smacks Is Genetically Engineered

According to the Kellogg’s website, Smacks is made with “ingredients sourced from genetically engineered crops”. Therefore, Smacks is a GMO product.

7. Dig’em Frog Wasn’t the Only Smacks Mascot

Smacks Cereal has seen numerous mascots since it’s introduction in 1953. Although Dig’em Frog is probably the most famous Smacks mascot, others include Quick Draw McGraw, Cliffy the Clown, and Smaxey the Seal.

Smacks MascotDebut Year
Cliffy the Clown1953
Smaxey the Seal1957
Quick Draw McGraw1961
The Smackin’ Bandit1965
The Smackin’ Brothers1966
Dig’em Frog1972
Love Smacks1982
Wally the Bear1986
Dig’em Frog1990

Here is a television commercial from 1978 featuring Dig’em Frog promoting Sugar Smacks.

8. Salmonella Was Found in Smacks in 2018

On June 14, 2018, Kellogg’s issued a voluntary recall of Honey Smacks citing salmonella. During this time, 135 people in 36 states were infected. Thankfully no deaths were reported.

9. New Smacks Cereal Recipe with Less Sugar

After the June 2018 recall of Smacks due to salmonella, Kellogg’s changed the recipe.  In November 2018 when Smacks returned to grocery store shelves, it contained a “simpler, updated recipe, while still delivering deliciously sweetened, honey-flavored puffed wheat cereal” according to Kellogg’s.

Prior to the new Smacks recipe, a 1 1/4 cup serving of Smacks cereal contained 25 grams of sugar. With the new recipe, a single serving of the same since contains 14 grams of sugar.

Honey Smacks new recipe


What are you thoughts of Smacks? Like it, love it, hate it? Let me know in the comments below. I personally won’t eat Smacks for breakfast, but maybe for a snack.

Also, if you love reading about cereal then check out some of my other cereal blog posts here.


Meet the Author

Since he was a child, Tony has eaten thousands of bowls of cereal. Learn how Tony got his start as The Cereal Guru, and why he decided to start this cereal blog. If you want to send Tony a quick message, then visit his contact page here.

1 thought on “9 Surprising Facts About Smacks Cereal”

  1. Although I’m certain it is by far the healthiest choice to make.. especially for our younger generation. But for those of us who grew up eating the ‘old’ recipe.. I sure miss my ‘Sugary’ Smacks.

    Reply

Leave a Comment